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Pro Strongman Mike Jenkins, Dead

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  • Pro Strongman Mike Jenkins, Dead

    My son told me this earlier today. He caught it from a Facebook friend. Here is a local media link:

    http://www.local21news.com/sports/fe...dies-659.shtml

    Very young, terrible.

  • #2
    I'm really curious what the cause of death was. The story said he died in his sleep. This is very sad news.

    Comment


    • #3
      "Most importantly, don't do this to define your life - do it to enrich it! There are many things more important than strongman and other sports; don't let it ruin the good things you had before you started! Mike Jenkins, May 11, 2011

      I didn't know anything about Mike Jenkins except that he won the Arnold and came in 4th at WSM in 2013. The above quote from the end of an interview on a strength forum indicates to me that he had many good things in life going for him, which really drives home what a tragedy this is.

      Comment


      • #4
        Condolences to Mikes family & friends, very sad indeed...
        ------
        Dave

        Comment


        • #5
          certainly a tragedy(ain't none of us gonna get outta here alive...) but more than that
          I continually am amazed how the "iron game" lives with such deaths ... and "accepts"
          them. Also (un-noticed here) a giant pro bodybuilder (a 400 pounder!)(Greg Kovacs) croaked the same week...
          (Being basically blood-thirsty(and hardly "politically correct") I kinda hope more "iron game" drug
          pigs die(and soon)... it would put a much more meaningful perspective on what's happening...
          It would wake some people up...) KW

          Comment


          • #6
            Hardly politically correct? I'll say. C'mon Kim, you wouldn't write a letter to MILO saying you "kinda hope...drug pigs die", would you? It's awful, it's horrible, it IS a tragedy, and best to leave it at that.

            Comment


            • #7
              Mike... yes, I WOULD write a letter like that... I was quoted saying a very similar thing
              in a Sports Illustrated article a few years back... so, what's the big deal? The "best to leave it at
              that" is what disappoints me and also enrages me. Few "iron gamers" seem
              to have the balls to speak out against insanity... I do.

              Comment


              • #8
                Len Bias, one of the greatest basketball players not to play Pro Basketball, died 27 years ago, two days after he was drafted by the Boston Celtics as a First Round pick. The myth of the times was that he a) died from Crack (it was regular Coke) and b) he was a first time user (he was not). When the general public learned that Cocaine could kill you, any amount, if your time happened to be up, it woke up the US. In one year, Cocaine use in the US went from 8 million users to 3 million users. Five million people stopped using cocaine in the US because Lenny Bias died. Five million people stopped, not because of a government anti-drug program, not because a scientist said so, but simply because it shocked them. There are a lot more than 3 million cocaine users in the US today, because an entire generation of people are too young to know who Len Bias was. I understand your point. Still, I can't wish death on stupidity, or on a group of people who for whatever reason, can't admit the truth.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Unfortunately, I don't think the death of Mike Jenkins or Greg Kovacs is enough to convince too many people to stop using steroids. First, I don't think either one of them made enough of an impact on their respective sports. Given a few more years, perhaps Mike would have but Greg never really won any major contests and just seemed to disappear. Second, both bodybuilding and strongman are relatively obscure sports and many people who use steroids for football or other big name sports, may not even know who they are. Third, because many deaths of steroid users are officially attributed to other things such as heart or liver problems, it makes it easy for people to convince themselves that the steroids weren't the initial cause. Last, but not least, a lot of people are just too hard-headed to learn their lesson.

                  Personally, I haven't read anything about the official cause of Mike Jenkins' death so I'm not going to assume it was steroid related or that he even took them to begin with. It's still tragic. He was still somebody's son, brother and/or best friend and my condolences go out to his family and friends.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kim Wood View Post
                    certainly a tragedy(ain't none of us gonna get outta here alive...) but more than that
                    I continually am amazed how the "iron game" lives with such deaths ... and "accepts"
                    them. Also (un-noticed here) a giant pro bodybuilder (a 400 pounder!)(Greg Kovacs) croaked the same week...
                    (Being basically blood-thirsty(and hardly "politically correct") I kinda hope more "iron game" drug
                    pigs die(and soon)... it would put a much more meaningful perspective on what's happening...
                    It would wake some people up...) KW
                    Kim -

                    I had no idea that Greg Kovacs had died until I read your post—there goes another one.

                    Not sure that many will buy into your wish unless maybe you can sell tickets to The Final Moments of Being Big or maybe you could start a betting pool . . . names, expiration dates, etc.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Craig T. Covington View Post
                      Unfortunately, I don't think the death of Mike Jenkins or Greg Kovacs is enough to convince too many people to stop using steroids. First, I don't think either one of them made enough of an impact on their respective sports. Given a few more years, perhaps Mike would have but Greg never really won any major contests and just seemed to disappear. Second, both bodybuilding and strongman are relatively obscure sports and many people who use steroids for football or other big name sports, may not even know who they are. Third, because many deaths of steroid users are officially attributed to other things such as heart or liver problems, it makes it easy for people to convince themselves that the steroids weren't the initial cause. Last, but not least, a lot of people are just too hard-headed to learn their lesson.

                      Personally, I haven't read anything about the official cause of Mike Jenkins' death so I'm not going to assume it was steroid related or that he even took them to begin with. It's still tragic. He was still somebody's son, brother and/or best friend and my condolences go out to his family and friends.

                      Craig -

                      I'm with you on these deaths probably not having much impact on people's decision to use and also the need to avoid jumping to conclusions and above all remembering what pain this causes the family and friends involved.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Craig T. Covington View Post
                        Unfortunately, I don't think the death of Mike Jenkins or Greg Kovacs is enough to convince too many people to stop using steroids. First, I don't think either one of them made enough of an impact on their respective sports. Given a few more years, perhaps Mike would have but Greg never really won any major contests and just seemed to disappear. Second, both bodybuilding and strongman are relatively obscure sports and many people who use steroids for football or other big name sports, may not even know who they are. Third, because many deaths of steroid users are officially attributed to other things such as heart or liver problems, it makes it easy for people to convince themselves that the steroids weren't the initial cause. Last, but not least, a lot of people are just too hard-headed to learn their lesson.

                        Personally, I haven't read anything about the official cause of Mike Jenkins' death so I'm not going to assume it was steroid related or that he even took them to begin with. It's still tragic. He was still somebody's son, brother and/or best friend and my condolences go out to his family and friends.
                        1. I agree with what Craig says here as much as anything I have read on the forum.
                        2. Over on the Gripboard, Richard Sorin had mentioned that he had heard that Mike Jenkins picked up an infection at WSM in China, and died of complications from that. Have not seen or heard anything anywhere else on that, and did not ask him his source.
                        3. The world is different from the 1986 world when the death of one person sent shockwaves and scared millions straight, as with the case of Len Bias and Cocaine. If Barry Bonds were to get ill with kidney problems (not heart, not brain, not etc.) the world could wake up. With football, and wrestling, there are too many other occupational hazards that keep steroids from being a "smoking gun". Baseball? It doesn't have the same occupational hazards as other sports, and when combined with something like kidneys, it could have the potential of a wake up call. Lyle Azado tried to call attention to his roid use on his deathbed, and that didn't seem to stop anyone, many said it was probably something else. And, in 2013, not 1986, it would probably take someone of Bonds' stature to get any attention.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          we certainly don't know the real "cause and effect" in any of these deaths... and death(or
                          any severe physical(or mental) consequence) is hardly a deterrent for today's man ...
                          I think what disappoints me most is the lack of true journalism in the "strength sports"
                          (I've also used the term "iron game")... what is being presented to us is not what's happening
                          (and certainly this is also true for "main-stream sports" like baseball, football and basketball...)...
                          the "sport" is elemental(you pick things up...you squeeze things together...you eat good...
                          you sleep...you get stronger) the real practices are not... the picture painted is often fantasy...
                          and smart individuals(who should know better) live with and pass along fantasy

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            What do you think is the reason for this lack of true journalism? Do these smart individuals pass along the fantasy just to protect their precious sport and it's participants from controversy? Is it because they think the fantasy will sell much better than the reality? I figure it's probably a bit of both but is there more to it than that?

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                            • #15
                              I've really thought about your question, Craig... no quick and simple answer... yes, like Lou Thesz used to say,
                              "...all men love their fantasies..." and yes there seems to be a high level of corruption(all sorts of corruption
                              ...from personal to corporate to governmental...) in our culture these days but the real reason is probably that
                              what is happening is just "too big" for the "journalists" to perceive and capture... people are drawn to the "iron
                              game" for it's simplicity...for it's "elemental" nature... but in reality what's happening is very complex(and even twisted)... people don't particularly want that so, they don't SEE that... many are comfortable and happy with
                              the "simple" and "fantasy " explanation...

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Mr. Wood,
                                You're right. One of the things I really like about lifting is it's simplicity (lift weights, get stronger). I've competed in several sports over the years but I'm not really a "competitive" person (I don't care if I lose) so it boggles my mind knowing the great lengths people will go to and the foolish things they'll do to themselves and/or just to win. And the corruption of the folks in charge who allow and encourage this behavior is astonishing. I'm pretty simple minded, so as much as I love lifting weights, for me, that's all it is, lifting weights. Nothing more, nothing less. How and why people have made it so complicated and twisted is beyond me.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I think a lot of people are already assuming that Mike Jenkins died as a direct result of steroid use. And are condemning him for it. What if it was a heart-related illness that took his life? Do we then berate him - posthumously - for his crappy diet and lack of focused cardio work? Most of us are committing a form of slow motion suicide with our dietary choices, life choices, some sort of choice that is likely to shorten our lifespan. Live and let live. As far as I know, his supplementation program didn't directly affect anyone on this forum.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    got "the new" Muscle Mag today(it's back!)... Mike Jenkins had an article(he's gone.)
                                    (too many "strongmen" have died in their prime...actually, a rather high percentage relative
                                    to the number of "professional players"in that game... who knows why this poor guy died?
                                    but on the whole anyone who thinks "strongman" is not a very dirty and physically dangerous
                                    activity is a fool... )

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I feel i have to say something I left this forum for a while because kim was being a troll and i gave up grip Now im doing strongman .not anything major I came back now i see kims drivel again. Ur a nasty man kim wood .u have no heart .u should be banned u bring to much negative to this forum .god bless mike jenkins.why cant people just remember all the good things and not go rooting through murky depths to tarnish someone .so what if he did use .got nothing to do with u .we all human and we make are own paths ..rant over

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        A week ago yesterday, I went to funeral. It was for a local high school athlete director who was a teacher, coach, athletic director, and award-winning regional (included Silicon Valley, so well over a million population, hundreds of schools) athletic official. I knew his family a long time. He was 55, died suddenly. No cause of death was given.

                                        The service was in a high school gym. Well over 1000 people in attendance. He had an 8-year-old son.

                                        The fellow was overweight, and worked tirelessly for his alma mater. Someone mentioned that the school would need to hire at least two guys to replace him, as he worked that much.

                                        It was a Catholic service. The priest, a decades-long veteran of local churches, very well-known and respected, talked rather candidly. He said he hoped that this was a gift to those who knew the deceased to watch their lifestyle, their diet, their exercise habits, their balance of work-family, their work habits, etc. He said all of this as he stood in front of the grieving family, a family that had lost the father less than two weeks earlier, the patriarch of the family (he was 80). The family had not yet gotten over that death. He said that with the 8 year old son sitting right in front of him.

                                        Was there any adverse reaction? After all, he could have been accused of criticizing the deceased as being a fat, selfish, junk-food-eating workaholic who did not care about his family. No, not one bit. Although the priest was candid, he did it in a rather well-meaning manner.

                                        Let me put it this way. It made me think. It made me thing about Jesse Marunde, JP, and the recently departed Mike Jenkins. And it made me think about myself as well (right now I am heavier than I should be).

                                        Am I defending KW's sometimes insensitive remarks? No. But, after that funeral, I am certainly less adverse to "we can't talk about certain things because it is inappropriate" than I was before. My business mentor once told me about an employee whom he did not like to take "the pickax to the head approach" in dealing with HR matters, but that was the only thing that worked with the guy. I think Wood views many in the Iron Game who only respond to the "Pickax to the Head" approach. So, he uses it. And it upsets many. And when I say "leave it at that", he gets upset. But, this is not going to be the last time this happens. It is going to happen again and again and again. Until something big changes.

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