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  • Hub Question

    I have owned a hub for a while and played with it off and on, but now I am getting serious about lifting 45 pounds on it. My goal is to do the crushed to dust challenge. I am doing sets in the range of 12 to 20 reps. I put the weight on the ground, let go and regrab for each rep. I just upped the weight to 27.5 pounds and got 13 reps. I am following the advice Laine gave over on the Rolling Thunder thread and using it for the hub. My question is about what most people find fails first? I would have thought my thumb would give out on me, but it is not the problem. My fingers do, particularly the tips and first knuckle. I use block weights as well, but it is my thumb that gives out there.

  • #2
    I have tried different approaches over the years. I believe that when you are starting out on the device, high reps as you are doing is necessary to toughen up the fingers. Your fingers need to get used to the nails practically punching through the skin. I could see doing something similar by increasing the weight and doing maybe 6 reps. In the early phase of getting used to the device, around 25 reps might be good. Not one set, but over 2 or 3 sets with different weights. The only serious injury I had from the Hub, and it took 3 months to heal, was on my ring finger. Between the 1st and 2nd knuckle, it just "went out", terrible pain, didn't touch it for 6-8 weeks. The thumb is stronger than the fingers so it is safer than the others. I don't think of any of them as "failing" on the Hub, just not strong enough.
    When I became more experienced, I would tend to go two reps on each hand, moving it up 5 lbs. at a time: 40, 45, 50, and then going to one rep at a time when the weight got higher. I would stop when I got to failure. So a workout might only be a dozen reps. Now, I only work it once a week, which seems plenty. Starting out, I was doing it two times a week.
    The IronMind Hub has become more popular in the last two years than it ever has been. But to veteran American competitive grip guys, because it does not seem to have a lot of carryover to other events, they tend to avoid it. Seems that it is darn popular with the Russians and Finns, judging by the results of a recent contest...

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    • #3
      I am not naturally strong by any stretch of imagination and have had to work pretty hard for my modest accomplishments. Yet I managed 45 lbs on the hub the first time I tried it and can do in the low 60s, without training it. The only serious grip training I had done prior to attempting the hub was grippers; no pinch or thick bar to speak of and only a little bending, so if you are looking to improve your hub my advice would be to train grippers hard in addition to the hubbing. Presumably you already do this since you're on this forum, heh.

      However, if CTD is your goal, my advice would be to completely focus on the RT and thick bar. I cannot see somebody capable of a 200 lbs RT lift failing with the hub or the #2.
      On ignore list:
      Sam Scott, Kim Wood, Dave Murray

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Magnus Gustafsson View Post

        However, if CTD is your goal, my advice would be to completely focus on the RT and thick bar. I cannot see somebody capable of a 200 lbs RT lift failing with the hub or the #2.
        ^^^ This.

        If CTD is your ONLY goal, I would go as far as to say you can set your IMHub on a shelf and not touch one again until CTD challenge day (provided you can lift the 200 on the RT).
        The most difficult and most productive part of grip training...the time between workouts. -me

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        • #5
          Andrew Durniat is the best American grip competitor, from a pure grip standpoint. I doubt if he trains the hub. He pulled 52 lbs. in that 8 city world wide King Kong grip contest a few weeks ago. I don't agree with the others that pulling 45 is something that happens automatically. Maybe for some, but from what you have described, not for you.
          But the Rolling Thunder is going to be the sticking point for the majority of people who attempt the CTD.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Mike Corlett View Post
            Andrew Durniat is the best American grip competitor, from a pure grip standpoint. I doubt if he trains the hub. He pulled 52 lbs. in that 8 city world wide King Kong grip contest a few weeks ago. I don't agree with the others that pulling 45 is something that happens automatically. Maybe for some, but from what you have described, not for you.
            But the Rolling Thunder is going to be the sticking point for the majority of people who attempt the CTD.
            Yeah Mike...I noticed that and thought it a bit odd also. I wondered if he took too big of a jump or something (like myself).

            But even when Andrew was only pulling 235lbs on the RT...he had absolutely no problems double hubbing 45's (although plate dependent, I believe is harder than 45lbs on the IMHub). Here's a clip from a 2009 medley (about 8 seconds in). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2fu_LjweglM

            Your point is well made, but I think you can find 1 in 50 men who can walk up and pull 45 on the IMHub...where the 200lbs RT is more like 1 in 20,000. (hard scientific numbers backed by me pulling them out of thin air)

            The most difficult and most productive part of grip training...the time between workouts. -me

            Comment


            • #7
              I have always been in awe of guys who pull big numbers on "real" hubs. The IronMind Hub appears to me to be a "learned" skill (for some) unlike some devices where some can just grab and pull very well. The version of Rolling Thunder that was very short-lived (a month or two or three in between the original and the current version)...I saw three random guys at the LA Fit Expo pull whatever the weight was, and I missed it. I was quite embarrassed. They were all young, tall, and strong guys.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the responses guys. Yes, I work grippers and the Rolling Thunder. I can already close a #2 pretty easily. The Rolling Thunder I think is going to be the worst of the 3 for me. I have made some progress on it recently though. I am not sure if it is a problem but my fingers are pretty flexible and on the hub they bend backward pretty far. This causes some pain. Enough that I don't feel any pain from the nails biting into my hand. I did bruise my ring finger a few weeks ago right on the joint. It healed up quickly though.

                Comment


                • #9
                  200# is pretty tough on a RT. I see a lot of guys right under it. Not too many over. CTD should just be called the Rolling Thunder Cert. Everyone I have seen do it or even fail it TNS the #2.

                  Hubs are a bit of a mystery and probably have a lot to due with the physicality of your hand. It also seems adding a percentage of weight is difficult. I pulled 40# on the IM Hub out of the box. 50# on the third workout. I really want to break 60#. The WR is my weight category is 68.28#, so maybe this isn't out of the question. Anyway, so far, I have found holding for time to be the most productive.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I tested my max on the hub yesterday and was able to pull 40 pounds. I will test again in 6 weeks. I suspect that reaching 45 will not be that hard on the hub. 200 on the Rolling Thunder though is another matter. I think I will close the #2.5 before I get to 200 on the RT.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mike Sharkey View Post
                      200# is pretty tough on a RT. I see a lot of guys right under it. Not too many over. CTD should just be called the Rolling Thunder Cert. Everyone I have seen do it or even fail it TNS the #2. . .

                      "CTD should just be called the Rolling Thunder Cert."

                      Seems to absolutely be how some guys feel about this and I'm not sure whether you were following all the discussion about this weight when the Crushed To Dust Challenge was announced and we were considering these levels. Then, as things turned out, the percent of the world record for each of the three disciplines turned out to be the same, even though TEDS had originally generated the values without running the numbers.

                      Still, I think part of this depends on where you swim: in some ponds, there is a big emphasis on grippers, so having mastering a Captains of Crush No. 2 gripper would be pretty pedestrian and in others, a 200-lb. Rolling Thunder is pretty light . . . 250 lb. would just make you one of the guys.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Randall Strossen View Post

                        250 lb. would just make you one of the guys.
                        Haha. I would love to be just "one of those guys"!!! I will be able to close the CoC #3 before I get past 150# on the RT

                        I'd actually be curious to see a top 50 list of all RT pulls. Those are kind of cool lists because you can see the spread and understand better what a median # is.

                        Edit: also I just like #'s.

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