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Thomas Inch Dumbbell Replicas

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  • #41
    I have a number of Inch bell replicas and own the original pattern Staver used up until the time he shut down the foundry to retire. I have the lighter 158lb. gift he sent to me CLEARLY marked as well as two 138 lb. clearly marked 138Lb. identical size casts that by mistake were a different mix of cast iron was used at the foundry. They were returned to me by customers, weighed, marked, and 172lb replicas sent out to correct the error. I have two other Inch 172lb. replicas plainly marked. One was used at the Arnolds as a strongman event tie breaker and also lifted by Phil Phister and Mark Henry as well.In 2002 I was contacted at short notice to supply an Inch replica for the 2002 AOBS Mark Henry attempt at a full clean and push jerk. The bell was cast at Staver for me sent at some expense direct via express truck,hand delivered to the hotel, weighed (at few ounces over the original's weight) labeled clearly, and locked in a secure closet waiting for the trial attempt. It was locked under supervision several "experts eyes" and then the key was retained I think by Vick Boff. At "go" time the bell with witnesses watching again emerged from the closet and was pulled into the AOBS room. The lift late in the evening was done and the dumbbell marked by me and readied for shipping down to Sorinex. This bell has been marked from that day has been used and on constant public display here. This dumbbell was the one also used at the first and second Mighty Mitts show at the Arnold's. Recently, an attempt to better Mark Henry's historic 2002 lift was done on the exact same clearly marked from 2002 bell. Rich Williams cleaned and push pressed the bell nearly missing a second rep. It was found out by myself that reviewing the video for the first time TODAY a thigh brush ocurred during the clean by Rich so in my opinion not equaling the 2002 stellar effort by Mr. Henry. One year ago this same pair of 172 lb. bells were pressed (not push pressed or jerked) from the shoulders by Rich Williams. I would invite anyone to check the bells or supply references of the hundreds that have seen, used, and witnessed the real history of the Inch replicas that reside here. Hopefully this information may be of help. Richard Sorin

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    • #42
      Thanks, Richard. No question the Inch replica lifted by
      Mark Henry at that AOBS was one of the Staver 172 pounders.
      The story I like concerning Inch replicas at the AOBS (and it
      was at this one or the one a year later) was when everyone
      had left Slim's grandson(a lanky kid six-two or six-three
      and maybe 15 years old)...was picking up and was seen
      lifting the Inch replica onto the "bell-hop" 's hotel cart with one hand! Now, I didn't see him do it but the individual who says he
      did see it was very reputable...and I went with him to tell
      Slim about it. Now, Slim was holding after mid-night court
      out in the hall with the Corlett's and a few others... we told him about what the kid did... he looks at us like we were really stupid and says, "Come on. It's only a 172 pounds!"

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      • #43
        Like it. :;hy) When I first had a go at the original I probably felt as many do - '****! That's hard' and so on. But many years later I find I can pick up the much heavier Millennium sans warm up or chalk and so would be with Slim on the 'it's only 172lbs' vibe.

        Often on certain forums I have seen many write something like 'I'll never do X' (X being some feat of strength) and I and others reply 'if that's how you think then it's true... YOU never will'. In the gym we have here in Gloucester, as with a few like it the world over, there are some seriously strong guys and the less strong see feats take place all the time. That and the positive encouragement they get means they see what others might see as 'impossible' as something they might get to do. I'm certain Slim's son has seen some amazing feats of strength, some daily, and so it becomes the norm.

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        • #44
          Weather you think you can or you can't - you're probably right.

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          • #45
            Originally posted by Chris Rice View Post
            Weather you think you can or you can't - you're probably right.
            Ten years ago, I thought I would be able to lift it. I couldn't. Still can't.

            Seven years ago, I thought I would be able to lift a 50 lb Blob. I couldn't. Still can't.

            Proves you don't have to be young to have unrealistic false confidence. :;hy)

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            • #46
              I was curious today and thought and thought about what the Inch replica weighed when checked prior to the 2002 AOBS attempt. I remember thinking it was about 1/2lb. (8 oz) heavier than the original) I am pretty sure the figure that came up in 2002 was 172 lb 13 oz. Today on a very accurate electronic scale it came up at 173.00 (to the tenth of an ounce)a small piece of rubber 1/4" square and about 24" long was placed on the scale bed to prevent damage and the bell rolling. It is very light at best weighs a few (1-3oz)ounces so I think our findings and "reality" 9 years later kind of match up well. If I can get a postage scale for letters I will try to get the weight of the band itself.
              Flash update!...on postal scale band weighs .10 lb.(or1.6 oz).RS

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              • #47
                Originally posted by Mike Corlett View Post
                Ten years ago, I thought I would be able to lift it. I couldn't. Still can't.

                Seven years ago, I thought I would be able to lift a 50 lb Blob. I couldn't. Still can't.

                Proves you don't have to be young to have unrealistic false confidence. :;hy)
                Mike - I borrowed John Eaton's replica a little over a year ago and worked with it until I had to return it to him. My best attempt was a lift of about a foot - close but no cigar as they say. I have set a goal of lifting the Inch Dumbbell. I "believe" that I can this - only time will tell. It's the only normal old time feat of Grip strength that has eluded me that I have any interest in pursuing at this time.

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                • #48
                  I've been reading old threads today and have a question. The issue with the Inch (and replicas) is the spin as we all know. And a common way to train for it is with plate loaded dumbbells - working up with weight over time. But the "feel" is different even when the plates are locked down tight and cannot spin on the handle. People can often lift more on a DB than the weight of the Inch and still can't lift the Inch. Can some physics or math guy explain the "why" behind this?

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                  • #49
                    I believe it is due to the different rotary inertia of the bells, compared with plates. This is a measure of the way the mass is distributed about the rotational axis. The rotary inertia about the 'tilt' axis will have an influence, as well as the 'spin' axis.

                    A Classic physics question is which rolls faster down a slope, a hollow cylinder or a solid one? The link below gives an explanation.

                    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...oocyl.html#hc1

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                    • #50
                      Originally posted by Paul Wood View Post
                      I believe it is due to the different rotary inertia of the bells, compared with plates. This is a measure of the way the mass is distributed about the rotational axis. The rotary inertia about the 'tilt' axis will have an influence, as well as the 'spin' axis.

                      A Classic physics question is which rolls faster down a slope, a hollow cylinder or a solid one? The link below gives an explanation.

                      http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...oocyl.html#hc1
                      Thanks Paul - that's the first time I have seen an explanation that makes sense to me - not that I understand the math completely but the reasoning works for me.

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                      • #51
                        Chris,

                        I'd think it would also have to do with the actual size of the plates you use to create your dunbell - 2 x 45's on each end would obviously have a different "feel" in the hand than a load of 9 x 10's on each end, even if lifted perfectly on the level, nevermind compared to the actual physical dimensions of say an Inch or Millenium.

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                        • #52
                          gents, I have been looking on the 'net to get the handle dimensions of the Inch and it appears reports vary regarding the actual width size, somewhere in the 2-inch range but I can find nothing regarding the handle width. has anyone got handle width/length measurements?
                          don't argue with idiots, they take you down to their level and then beat you with experience

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                          • #53
                            As far as the Inch goes, I always think of the giant boulder chasing Indiana Jones in one of the early scenes of Raiders of the Lost Ark. The spherical object is very intent on moving, not standing still, and seems to have a mind of its own.

                            I just measured the handle width on my Replica. It is just a hair less than 4 inches. Had always heard it was 4 inches, but never bothered to measure it.

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                            • #54
                              thanks Mike
                              don't argue with idiots, they take you down to their level and then beat you with experience

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                Originally posted by Paul Wood View Post
                                I believe it is due to the different rotary inertia of the bells, compared with plates. This is a measure of the way the mass is distributed about the rotational axis. The rotary inertia about the 'tilt' axis will have an influence, as well as the 'spin' axis.

                                A Classic physics question is which rolls faster down a slope, a hollow cylinder or a solid one? The link below gives an explanation.

                                http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...oocyl.html#hc1
                                Well, five years, one month and a week later, Paul, I am finally thanking you for the best description yet for the challenge of the Inch. It has been said many times it is difficult to lift "because the handle is so thick". Yes that it true. But only a solid piece with Globe Bells has, as embedded in your link, "Rotational Kinetic Energy" forces working against you.

                                If I were an Iron Game emcee at one of these Expo-like contests or exhibitions (and I am not) I would work that into the routine: "Not only is the unusually thick handle stopping modern monsters like the Game of Thrones' 'The Mountain', the Rotational Kinetic Energy works to stop everyone except those possessing a truly World Class Grip."

                                Prior to this post, if you Google "Thomas Inch Dumbbell Rotational Kinetic Energy", you would not find anything.

                                Folks, you heard it here first.

                                Thanks Paul! Hope you are alive and well.

                                Rotational Kinetic Energy...

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