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competition standards for the yoke carry

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  • Geremy Freeman
    replied
    Originally posted by Peter Larabell View Post
    People have done a 4x carry. The heavy (heavier) bale tote carry at the Arnold's was 4x for guys for sure. The distance was shorter than a "normal super-yoke" though...

    As for turns, I've never seen one with a turn "with the yoke". I doubt it's very safe on the body to turn with a yoke. People periodically get hurt walking straight with one. I'd guess most competitors wouldn't WANT an event where you had to turn with the yoke off the ground.

    But, of course there have been many strongman competitions where an athlete must carry the yoke a given distance, drop it, turn 180deg (without the yoke, just spin your body around underneath), and pick the yoke back up and go back. An example of that style of event would be the 1st event of the 2012 WSM finals in L.A.

    As far as technique videos, it's hard to say... If you watch a large variety of elite level strongmen due yoke, you can see that they don't all do it the same way. Small differences in arm/hand position, bar placement, stance width... My guess is that each one does it the way that works best for them. I'm fortunate enough to go to a gym where there is a yoke, so I use one on occasion. I can tell you from personal experience that the way that some guys do it, doesn't work best for me. Granted I'm not built like an elite strongman.
    Thank you for your reply! I've been using a safety squat bar as a yoke substitute with a weight around 3X bdywt and my courses always involve at least two 180 deg turns-- one when unracking the bar and one when returning to the rack. I'd say the course is about 120'. It's very challenging but always fun. And knowing I can't put the weight down until I get back to the rack is a great incentive to be strong.

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter Larabell
    replied
    People have done a 4x carry. The heavy (heavier) bale tote carry at the Arnold's was 4x for guys for sure. The distance was shorter than a "normal super-yoke" though...

    As for turns, I've never seen one with a turn "with the yoke". I doubt it's very safe on the body to turn with a yoke. People periodically get hurt walking straight with one. I'd guess most competitors wouldn't WANT an event where you had to turn with the yoke off the ground.

    But, of course there have been many strongman competitions where an athlete must carry the yoke a given distance, drop it, turn 180deg (without the yoke, just spin your body around underneath), and pick the yoke back up and go back. An example of that style of event would be the 1st event of the 2012 WSM finals in L.A.

    As far as technique videos, it's hard to say... If you watch a large variety of elite level strongmen due yoke, you can see that they don't all do it the same way. Small differences in arm/hand position, bar placement, stance width... My guess is that each one does it the way that works best for them. I'm fortunate enough to go to a gym where there is a yoke, so I use one on occasion. I can tell you from personal experience that the way that some guys do it, doesn't work best for me. Granted I'm not built like an elite strongman.

    Leave a comment:


  • Geremy Freeman
    replied
    Originally posted by Peter Larabell View Post
    Hi Geremy,

    Based on past years of WSM it seems to be around 20m for distance, give or take, depending on the weight.

    As for the weight, 4x bodyweight is extreme. Consider for example that a small handful of the guys at WSM weight around 400lbs. WSM has not had a 1600lbs yoke. Usually it's around 1100, and if you go back a handful of years, even less. Additionally, just thinking back to more "recent" WSM events (think Mangus Ver and forward), incredible guys like Jason Bergmann, Mariusz Pudzianowski and Derek Poundstone were comparatively small, yet they weighted 285-315lbs or so... A 1000lbs-1100lbs yoke isn't even 4x for them, and they were the smallest in the field.

    Cheers!

    Great info, thank you for your reply! It sounds like some of the smaller guys are carrying weights that are close to 4x bdywt. Maybe this is on the horizon for someone.

    Do the competitors ever have to navigate turns with the yoke or is it always a straight line? Can you recommend any articles or videos on technique for the yoke?

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter Larabell
    replied
    Hi Geremy,

    Based on past years of WSM it seems to be around 20m for distance, give or take, depending on the weight.

    As for the weight, 4x bodyweight is extreme. Consider for example that a small handful of the guys at WSM weight around 400lbs. WSM has not had a 1600lbs yoke. Usually it's around 1100, and if you go back a handful of years, even less. Additionally, just thinking back to more "recent" WSM events (think Mangus Ver and forward), incredible guys like Jason Bergmann, Mariusz Pudzianowski and Derek Poundstone were comparatively small, yet they weighted 285-315lbs or so... A 1000lbs-1100lbs yoke isn't even 4x for them, and they were the smallest in the field.

    Cheers!

    Leave a comment:


  • Geremy Freeman
    started a topic competition standards for the yoke carry

    competition standards for the yoke carry

    Can somebody share what the standards are in WSM, and other organizations, for the yoke walk. I'm most curious what distance(s) is used. Also, how heavy is the yoke? Is 4x bodyweight commonplace?

    Thank you in advance.
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